resume whore


Didn't get the job out East, but at least had a great interview and made another connection. The Director I interviewed with is really cool and has been helpful offering tips and sending along a job posting for another position she said that I would excel at, so that is encouraging.

Not feeling super confident about my resume, I had my boss at the library check it out and I am glad to say that the complete make over has left me feeling super confident. Who would have thought, right?!

In my never ending search for resume, interview, and cover letter tips I stumbled across this. Kudos to Monster.com for making me laugh. I think #1 is my favorite.

These 5 tips and more found here:

1. Using a Cutesy Email Address for Correspondence
Example: cutiepie@domain.com, or -- far worse -- something like sexkitten@domain.com.
You Might Think: It's a clever, memorable email address everyone will get a kick out of.
The Employer Will Probably Think: I can't believe someone would actually list this email address on her resume, let alone use it to correspond with me. Will she do the same thing on the job if I hire her? Yikes!

2. Putting a Silly Message on Your Answering Machine
Example: A is for academics, B is for beer -- and one of those reasons is why we're not here. So leave a message, OK?
You Might Think: Mine is the funniest answering machine message this side of the Mississippi. My friends will love it.
The Employer Will Probably Think: Good lord, this person probably lives in Animal House. And I just can't risk interviewing, let alone hiring, someone like Bluto or Flounder. Sorry, Charlie. Click.

3. Sending Your Resume and Cover Letter Without Proofreading
You Might Think: Everybody makes mistakes, even employers. So if there's a mistake or two on my resume, no big deal. The employer probably won't even notice, much less care.
The Employer Will Probably Think: Everybody makes mistakes, even employers. But making more than one minor mistake on a resume or in a cover letter is unacceptable, and often, even one is too many. How do I know this person will proofread the letters he writes to shareholders? What if he someday leaves a zero or two off one of our financial statements? I better put this resume aside and look for someone who's more accurate and thorough.

4. Winging Your Interviews Instead of Preparing Thoroughly
You Might Think: I'm good at thinking on my feet, and if I get stuck, I'll just BS my way through, like I've done on many an essay exam. Besides, they can't expect me to know everything about the company.
The Employer Will Probably Think: This person clearly knows nothing about the company, nor has she made any effort to learn more about us and what we do. She must not really care whether or not she gets the job. I want someone who cares. Oh well, maybe the next person will be better.

5. Failing to Send Thank-You Notes After Interviews
You Might Think: A thank-you note? You're kidding, right? Do people even do that sort of thing anymore?
The Employer Will Probably Think: This person has no follow-up skills, not to mention common courtesy. He could have at least dropped me a quick email note, like this other person did. I think I'll invite this candidate for the second round of interviews instead. The other guy must not really want the position.

After reading this I realized I should probably change my email to something else. Who would have thought honkeytonkbadonkadonk@domain.com might keep me from getting the job...?

Comments

#3 & #4 absolutely. I've interviewed 70 people in the last 3 years for various positions and many think they can wing it. I interviewed someone from minnesota (phone interview) about 4 months ago. be prepared. most companies/ libraries have a web site: read as much as you can. most cities have online papers with some free access or use your local library to research your potential employer. it's not always your fault if you get stumped by an unexpected interview question, but have a prepared answer for the usuals: "what would your employer/teacher/whoever say is your strongest/weakest trait?" "give an example of a time when...." if you are asked for examples, be specific. always be prepared with an answer even if it means you make one up. if so, make up one that displays your skills: a customer wanted something we didn't have and you went out of your way to get it, or customer was mad and you took the right steps to make him happy. I never care about thank you notes, especially if the interview was bad because then I feel guilty for not selecting her. answering machine doesn't matter; email address doesn't matter, not to me. besides human resources makes all the calls for us. I just call to arrange interview appointments. just be on time and call back if it's expected -- never, ever fail to appear without a call: that can get you blacklisted at that organization. government agencies are required to be fair, so you should worry less if you interview for a city or county system (except for the blacklisting thing - I've never done it to anyone, but it is on our forms - if you get blacklisted you can't interview with us for one year). oh, almost forgot, read this, funny: http://reading.madness.sk/funny_text-117.php
french panic said…
I am morally opposed to sending thank you notes for interviews - YOU are also interviewing the employer, after all.

I also have felt like a complete a-hole trying to write thank you notes for interviews:

thank you for asking me dozens of the usual boring questions. thank you for being 10 minutes late and not apologizing. thank you for not reading my resume in advance of this interview.

I never did get a job that I wrote a thank you note for. And I never know how to get everyone's contact information when it is a group interview - as one is leaving the interview, do you say "thank you, now please give me your business cards so that I can write you a heartfelt thank you note even though I AM THANKING YOU RIGHT NOW in person."

What about phone interviews? Are you supposed to extend the pain by making everyone give you their contact information? What about the HR people? "Thank you for sitting in on my interview and giving absolutely zero input. I really appreciate the non-effort!"

I feel your pain, monster. Looking for a job suuuucks. Good luck.
Thanks French Panic,

I feel that the thank you notes are also cheesy, but my bosses at my current library encouraged me to, and honestly, though I did not get the last job, the Director has already sent me some info about another job that is nearby and up my alley...so, who knows...maybe my thank you note helped...? Or else it was the $50 I left on the table.

:)

Still whoring out the resumes...
french panic said…
one more thing.... effing made a valuable and often severely overlooked point about doing some research before the interview.

Think about doing some hardcore business-type research about who you are interviewing with, too. Business mandates, the approach to their library system (any major collections cutbacks or staff layoffs in the last 5 years?). This can really affect morale at the place where you are interviewing, and something that should be considered.

I know it's really tempting to take that first job offer out of school (I did - and o what a mistake THAT was!) but listen to your gut and do a LOT of research. Another former library school inmate of mine also took his first job offer and it was a total disaster - he didn't want it in the first place but felt he couldn't be choosy (he was in his mid-40s at the time and various super duper negative forces on staff at library school told him he better take whatever he could get). I also found this blog-posting that you might find helpful (sorry, can't make the html links because I am at work on a french keyboard...blah blah blah)

http://alex.halavais.net/tips-for-academic-job-applications/
Thanks French Panic...looked at the link.
I did that before my last couple of resumes...did some searching and got as much info as possible about both the city and the library so I could point out spec. programs, etc. that I liked, etc.
Appreciate the link!
~Monster

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