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Showing posts from January, 2009

status symbol?

As best friend K and I sit across from each other at Caribou--occasionally chatting--we are both tooling around on Facebook.

Yep. We are those Yuppy idiots at the coffee shop.

We were just chatting about peoples' face book status lines,

"Monster is: _____________________ (you fill in the blank)."

People use this line to:

discuss their political views, "Monster is 'YES WE CAN!'"share that they are sick, "Monster is coughing up a lung!"share your dieting tricks, "Monster is using a thigh master plus!"And more...So, thought we'd come up with some good status line messages:"Monster is making fun of your Mom.""Monster is waxing someone's back.""Monster is sitting on the toilet...while I write this!""Monster is worried about the raising rates of kitty AIDS!"So, what does your status line say!?

greeting his characters no more

"Each morning my characters greet me with misty faces willing, though chilled, to muster for another day's progress through the dazzling quicksand the marsh of blank paper." John Updike

Writer John Updike passed away today. Updike was 76. Article here at NPR.

Here is a Bibliography of his works:
THE CARPENTERED HEN AND OTHER TAME CREATURES, 1958
HOPING for a HOOPOE, 1958
THE POORHOUSE FAIR, 1959
THE SAME DOOR, 1959
RABBIT, RUN, 1960
'A&P', 1961 (short story, first published in The New Yorker)
PIGEON FEATHERS, 1962
THE CENTAUR, 1963
TELE PHONE POLES, 1963
OLINGER STORIES, 1964
OF THE FARM, 1965
ASSORTED PROSE, 1965
THE MUSIC SCHOOL, 1966
THE COUPLES, 1968
MIDPOINT AND OTHER POEMS, 1969
BECH: A BOOK, 1970
MUSEUMS AND WOMEN, 1972
RABBIT REDUX, 1972
SIX POEMS, 1973
BUCHANAN DYING, 1974
A MONTH OF SUNDAYS, 1975
PICKED-UP PIECES, 1975
MARRY ME, 1976
TOSSING AND TURNING, 1977
THE COUP, 1978
AN ODDLY LOVELY DAY ALONE, 1979
PROBLEMS, 1979
SIXTEEN SONNETS, 1979
FIVE POEMS, 1980
YOUR LOVER JUST CALLE…

better than playing in traffic: activities for babies in the library

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I am always in pursuit of cool sensory things for the Baby storytime group which I work with, for two reasons: 1. It is really hard to do cool things with babies...everything is a choking or poisoning hazard. 2. I feel because of reason #1, this group gets overlooked a little in the Library world.

So, I decided to dedicate some time to come up with cutesie things I could do/use with the babies. I came up with two ideas. The first is not a new idea, it is something I actually learned about a million years ago when I was a daycare/preschool teacher. When I worked with infants we used to make these cool water shakers, which the babies always loved and which kept their attention. These were also fun for the infants learning to roll over and crawl. They would bat the bottles around and try to chase them. These shaker bottles are super simple to make; the instructions are as follows:
Just take any empty water bottle, wash it out and rip off the labels. (If you are having a problem getting the…

Obama's reading list

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For those of you, who like me, like to know what people are reading/what people's favorites books are! I found an article called, "Barack Obama's Favorite Books." Thought I would share some of it:
“The often repeated claim that Barack Obama will be America’s most bookish president is probably a little harsh on the 43 past residents of the White House. Recently Karl Rove, George Bush’s Deputy Chief of Staff from 2004 until 2007, revealed his boss read 95 books in 2006 and another 51 in 2007 but no-one is praising Mr Bush’s devotion to the written word.
Still, Barack Obama is clearly an avid reader and literature has massively influenced his politics. He talks about books at the drop of a hat, is frequently seen with a book in his hand and, of course, has penned two worldwide bestsellers himself. He has won Grammys for the audio versions of both his books – Dreams From My Father and The Audacity of Hope. He even used book tour appearances designed to promote The Audacit…

library's role in times of economic hardship

Another very close friend was laid off last week. That makes 3 out of my circle of friends here in the past 6 months.

My bro-in-law's company is still forcing all employees to work at a 3o% pay cut for the time being.

And also this week at Library X we just learned that we are still over budget (this after all of our materials budgets were cut substantially from last year) for the year and they are again cutting hours and asking people to pick up more slack. I am still safe. I honestly don't know how I would get all of my programming done if I worked any less hours.

All this got me to thinking of the library's role in our economic crisis. This article "Folks Are Flocking to the Library, a Cozy Place to Look for a Job," from the Wall Street Journal basically says what most Librarians have been noticing for a while now:


"A few years ago, public libraries were being written off as goners. The Internet had made them irrelevant, the argument went. But libraries acros…

hail to the Chief

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HOORAY!
PRESIDENT OBAMA: "My fellow citizens:
I stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. I thank President Bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition.
Forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath. The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms. At these moments, America has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because we the people have remained faithful to the ideals of our forebears, and true to our founding documents.
So it has been. So it must be with this generation of Americans.
That we are in the midst of crisis is now well understood. Our nation is at war, against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred. Our economy is…

sick and tired...literally

I am sick. Well, on the mend.
It came on Tuesday afternoon, right after my post. I wonder at that I was feeling so many tumultuous things on Tuesday and then I got sick. Foreshadowing, perhaps?
Anyway, the fever of Tuesday and Wednesday is gone, but the cough is persistent. I am thankful that I don't have a sore throat, as nothing vexes me more when I am sick than a sore throat, but this cough is giving me a headache. It is one of those really hard coughs that makes your whole body just ache.
Ugh.

This morning as I was leaving for work my car got stuck in a rut full of snow at the end of my driveway and there is decided to stay: half in my driveway, half in the street. People drove by and stared, probably marveling at my feat. I imagined neighbors peeking out their windows and saying, "Ehh?"

I had to have my car pulled out by a towing company; the same company who came and pulled me out when I slid off my driveway about a month ago. The same driver in fact who looked at me an…

tempest kind of day

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I am feeling very tempestuous today. My insides gather and slam into my rib cage, frothing and foaming like the unruly Sea as storms aproach. I am Caliban, wild and unruly. I could strike out and knock over buildings. My sighs could lay flat a field of wheat. The roll of my eyes is nearly audible. Ugh.
The only thing I can do in such times is pray and read poetry. This helped. One of my favorite poets; so familiar sometimes.
Storm Fear When the wind works against us in the dark, And pelts with snow The lowest chamber window on the east, And whispers with a sort of stifled bark,
The beast, ‘Come out! Come out!’-- It costs no inward struggle not to go, Ah, no! I count our strength, Two and a child, Those of us not asleep subdued to mark How the cold creeps as the fire dies at length, --How drifts are piled, Dooryard and road ungraded, Till even the comforting barn grows far away And my heart owns a doubt Whether ’tis in us to arise with day And save ourselves unaided.
~ Robert Frost, A Boy's Life, 1915

after respite

It is hard to think of what I want to say after posting nothing of my own substance as of late. With the holidays over and programs at the Library back in full swing, I feel like my week spent out East in Massachusetts--at the Farm I used to work out--was eons ago.

Best friend K and I were set to leave for our roadtrip the Sunday after Christmas...which we did. However, we decided to leave at 1:30 a.m. instead of 5am, to be adventurers, in "true roadtrip fashion," and really because we had gone out with our friends that night and neither one of us were the least bit tired...So it began. A journey. A roadtrip. A homecoming (for me).

When my Dad died just over a year ago, we spent the next 6 months cleaning out our family home that we had lived in for over 20 years.
My Mom moved out.
The house was sold.

And in all that I really lost a sense of "home," in that Hallmark Card sense of the word; the "home" where family gathers for holidays, dinners, etc. etc. Since …

slang for the new year

I love reading urban slang found here. It was cracking me up at work today. Here is a good one:Bunny Boiler"Taken from the Glenn Close character in 'Fatal Attraction', boiling her Ex'es pet rabbit. after a relationship break up, the person who wants some kind of revenge, like stalking, or harrasment 'Man i can't believe kate, after we broke up she keeps ringing my place and hanging up when I answer, she turned into a bunny boiler for real!' "I have never seen Fatal Attraction, so I guess I need to now.

misadventures in awards

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So, it appears that I have been awarded the Prémio Dardos Award by Michele at A Reader's Respite!

Doing some research, I found the best explanation of the award on Holly J's blog

"The Prémio Dardos is given for recognition of cultural, ethical, literary, and personal values transmitted in the form of creative and original writing. These stamps were created with the intention of promoting fraternization between bloggers, a way of showing affection and gratitude for work that adds value to the Web.

'Com Prémio Dardos se reconhecem os valores que cada blogueiro emprega ao transmitir valores culturais, éticos, literários, pessoais, etc. que, em suma, demonstram sua criatividade através do pensamento vivo que está e permanece intacto entre suas letras, entre suas palavras. Esses selos foram criados com a intenção de promover a confraternização entre os blogueiros, uma forma de demonstrar carinho e reconhecimento por um trabalho que agregue valor à Web.'

The rules are easy:

shout out!

Wanted to give a shout out and thank you to my newest followers (does anyone else think it's strange that they call people who read your blog "followers," sounds like I am forming a CULT!!):

Clover from Inchoate
CK from CK the Librarian
Jacob from Canyon Park Life
and Michelle at Readers Respite
(Michele--your profile picture is so beautiful--what sweet little babies you have!)

When people ask about blogging, one of the things that I always mention is how cool it is that we form communities in a sense by who's blogs we follow, so I appreciate you all stopping in and look forward to getting to "know you better," by reading your blogs as well. :)

I will try and post something more soon!

still here

I am still alive. I haven't had enough time to sit down and write anything worth while lately. Soon. Soon. Until then. Read this little slice of wonderful:

Are You There? W.H. Auden

Each lover has some theory of his own
About the difference between the ache
Of being with his love, and being alone:

Why what, when dreaming, is dear flesh and bone
That really stirs the senses, when awake,
Appears a simulacrum of his own.

Narcissus disbelieves in the unknown;
He cannot join his image in the lake
So long as he assumes he is alone.

The child, the waterfall, the fire, the stone,
Are always up to mischief, though, and take
The universe for granted as their own.

The elderly, like Proust, are always prone
To think of love as a subjective fake;
The more they love, the more they feel alone.

Whatever view we hold, it must be shown
Why every lover has a wish to make
Some kind of otherness his own:
Perhaps, in fact, we never are alone.

I have been thinking a lot about relationships lately, so this …

welcome the new year with poetry

"MAYBE January is the cruelest month. The holiday bills fester, the garden catalogs have not yet arrived with their immodest promises of spring, and escaping to warmer climes is harder now that the economy has stopped working.

It’s a perfect time to sit in a chair, calmly, with a lap robe and a comforting book of poetry, and to think about where we live, listen to the heartbeat of here, and learn how words mean home..." Tina Kelley, in a NYTimes article recently.

I thought I would share some links to some fav poems, though none of these peeps are from MI.

Hope everyone is having a Happy New Year!

Billy Collins, Thesaurus
Billy CollinsTaking off Emily Dickinson's Clothes
Robert Frost, October
Walt Whitman, I sing the body electric
Elizabeth Bishop,The Map

ENJOY!