My Community Analysis Paper

For those of you who I talked to about my Community Analysis paper-I got an A! I've included it below in case you want to know a little about some of the things that Librarians have to think about and take into consideration when deciding things like what they will include in their collections. For those of you Berkshirites, this history of Monterey might be interesting...? I chose this library since it is a small rural public library, similar to a library where I would like to work one day.

I did not include my Rationale section of the paper (the section that basically explains what collections I would add to this library, taking into account the Community Analysis.) For our project we get $5,000 to spend, which is not a lot! I have decided, since it is a small library, that I am going to focus on three small additions to the collection, all based on some things that the town is affected by: Tourism, Farming, and Mental health issues. (I just ask that if any MLIS students or Librarians come across this that you A. Find this as a possible guide for like assignments and B. DON'T PLAGERIZE ME!)
Apologies for the screwy format of the statistics and footnotes...those things did not translate. The stats were in tables. Anyway, without further ado...

Monterey Town Library: A Community Analysis
Monterey, Massachusetts


History of Monterey

Monterey, originally known as South Tyringham, was considered part of the Tyringham Valley settlements until 1847. It was in that year that South Tyringham separated from Tyringham and took the name of Monterey, allegedly after the victorious battle in the Mexican American War. Present day Tyringham is located North East of modern day Monterey.[1] This area, as well as the rest of modern day Berkshire County, was first inhabited by the Mahican Native Americans until, “The English finally paid the Indians 460 pounds, 3 barrels of cider, and 30 quarts of rum for what is today Berkshire County” (page 5. Wood, David H. Lenox Massachusetts Shire Town. Published by the town of Lenox, 1969).
The little town of Monterey, Massachusetts did not come from humble beginnings, but rather a proud start that began with its inception by state Legislature, in 1735, as a town developed to protect the land along around the Housatonic River and Valley, which was then a main connecting route to the Connecticut Valley and Boston.[2] The first settlers in this region came in 1739; Lieutenant Isaac Garfield and Captain Brewer (Brewer Pond’s namesake) were among those, and helped in building the first saw mill in the area, which ran on the Konkapot River. They were important in helping the mill economy get started in this area. [3] The industry in this area later grew to include some factories and a fur trade, though the area established itself, in the mid nineteenth century, as a vacation destination. [4] During the Revolutionary War, Monterey’s main road (now US 20) became known as Knox Trail, because it was here that General Henry Knox and other colonials crossed through from Fort Ticonderoga en route to end the siege of Boston.[5]
Geography

Monterey varies in altitude from approximately 1200 feet above sea level, with rough and stony ground that farmers have had to deal with for generations. Monterey is a country community with a focus in agriculture, and is known for its many beautiful woods areas, including Beartown State Forest. The two main lakes are Lake Garfield and Lake Buel, with the Konkapot also running through the middle of town. The Berkshire Hills also encounter 90 miles of trails that are a part of the Appalachian Trail, which runs from Georgia to Maine. The town falls within Berkshire County, approximately 120 miles from both New York City and Boston. “Berkshire County is the western most county in Massachusetts. It extends from north to south across the western portion of Massachusetts, with the state of New York to its west, the state of Vermont to the north, and the state of Connecticut to the south.”[6] Berkshire County is comprised of: Adams, Alford, Becket, Cheshire, Clarksburg, Cummington, Dalton, Egremont, Florida, Great Barrington, Hancock, Hinsdale, Housatonic, Lanesborough, Lee, Lenox, Monterey, Mount Washington, New Ashford, New Marlborough, North Adams, Otis, Peru, Pittsfield, Richmond, Sandisfield, Savoy, Sheffield, Stockbridge, Tyringham, Washington, West Stockbridge, Williamstown and Windsor.[7]

v Total Area: 27.32 square miles
v Land Area: 26.50 square miles
v Water Area: 0.82 square miles [8]

Demographics

People

People
Monterey
United States
Population
954
293,655,400
Population Density
33.6
80
Population Changes
-1.90%
5.88%
Median Age
42
37.6
Household Size
2.32
2.58
Race
White
99.17%
77.53%
Black
0.31%
12.35%
Asian
0.52%
3.58%
American Indian
0%
0.89%
Other
0%
5.65%
Hispanic
1.05%
12.73%
Family

Married w/Children
18.3%
27.90%
Married w/no Children
35.08%
31.04%
Single w/Children
5.48%
9.43%
Single w/no Children
40.69%
30.05%
Divorced
10.83%
7.64%
Separated
10.40%
2.82%
Widowed
4.33%
7.42%
Non married
52.93%
57.73%
Never married
21.51%
24.39%
[9]
Age
Sex and Age
Number
Percent
Male
445
47.6%
Female
489
52.4%
Under 5 yrs. old
37
4.0%
5-9
40
4.3%
10-14
51
5.5%
15-19
56
6.0%
20-24
57
6.1%
25-34
82
8.8%
34-44
148
15.8%
45-54
191
204%
55-59
64
6.9%
60-64
54
5.8%
65-74
106
11.3%
75-84
42
4.5%
85 years and older
6
.06%

Median Age
44.5
n/a
18 years and over
773
82.8%
Male
372
39.8%
Female
401
429%
21 years and over
741
79.3%
62 years and over
186
18.8%
66 years and over
154
16.5%
[10]

Economy

While the economy at one point relied on milling, Monterey’s biggest industry, as is typical of the region, tends to be rooted in its role as a vacation town. Monterey’s population rises to over double its normal numbers, as people flock from the city to swim and kayak at Lake Garfield or Lake Buel; hike in Beartown State Park, the Appalachian Trail, or Diane’s Trail. The county is a cultural explosion during the summer, which helps with the increase in visitors to Monterey. Berkshire County is known the world over for being the home of: Tanglewood, the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra; The Mount, Edith Wharton’s home; the Norman Rockwell Museum; MassMOCA (Massachusetts Museum of Modern Art); the Clark Art Museum; Shakespeare & Company; Chesterwood; Bidwell House; Jacob’s Pillow Dance Studio; Hancock Shaker Village; and Berkshire Botanical Gardens to name just a few.[11]
The downtown businesses consist of: The Post Office; the Monterey General Store; Grenadier Pottery (self-employed artist), the Town Hall offices; the Police Station and the Fire Department. Many of the other businesses in the area are small enterprises or family owned, for example, Rawson Brook Farm and Tryon Farm. There is also a non-profit organization, Gould Farm**.
(** denotes that half of the population that makes up Gould Farm are not full-time Monterey residents).

Economy
Monterey
United States
Unemployment Rates
4.00%
5.00%
Recent Job Growth
0.65%
1.30%
Future Job Growth
3.87%
9.06%
Sales Taxes
5.00%
6.00%
Income Taxes
5.95%
5.02%
Household Income
56,100
$44,684
Incomes per Capita
33,294
$24,020
[12]

Local Government

Form of Government: Board of Selectman
Open Town Meetings

Year incorporated as a town: 1847

Registered Voters: 503 persons
Democrats: 182 persons (36.2%)
Republicans: 94 persons (18.7%)
Un-enrolled Voters: 227 persons (45.1%)[13]

Education

Students in Monterey attend the following schools: The Monterey School (one room schoolhouse, Kindergarten only), Undermountain Elementary (Pre-K-6th), New Marlborough Central School (Pre-K-4th), and Mt Everett Regional School (7-12th).[14]

Education
Monterey
United States
School Expenditure
$7, 244
$6,058
Pupil/Teacher Ratio

15.9
Students/Librarian
307
907
Students/Counselor
188
546
[15]
Transportation and Access

The main roadways of Monterey are US 23 and Route 57, which also connect to Route 7. Airports are available both in Great Barrington and Pittsfield. Major railways service comes into Pittsfield and North Adams, with the Housatonic Railway in Sheffield.[16] There are no bus or taxi services available in Monterey.
[1] Information available from The Berkshires of Western Massachusetts, Monterey & New MarlboroughPage.[2] Information available from the Mass.gov-Berkshire County profile.[3] Information available from The Berkshire Web webpage.[4] Information available from the The Berkshires of Western Massachusetts, Monterey & New Marlborough webpage.[5] Information available from, A Revolutionary Day along Historic US Route 20 website. [6] Information available from Berkshire County, Massachusetts History & Genealogy.[7] Information available from Berkshire County, Massachusetts History & Genealogy.[8] Facts came from 2000 Census, available through link from US Census Bureau, Fact Finder link.[9] Statistics from 2000 census made available by Sperlingers.[10] Statistics available from the Department of Housing and Community Development, MA.[11] Information available through http://www.berkshires.org/.[12] Statistics from 2000 census made available by Sperlingers.[13] Statistics available from the Department of Housing and Community Development, MA.[14] Information available from Southern Berkshire Regional School District.[15] Statistics from 2000 census made available by Sperlingers.[16] Statistics available from the Department of Housing and Community Development, MA.P

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Boxcar Media. Berkshire Chamber of Commerce: Arts & Culture: Life The Way It’s
Meant To Be. Retrieved June 1, 2007. Website: http://www.berkshirebiz.org/Visit_the_Berkshires.html.

Cyber Haus. (1998). A Revolutionary Day Along Historic US Route 20. Retrieved June 4,
2007. Website: http://www.revolutionaryday.com/usroute20/tour.htm.

Erwin, Marie. (2007). Southern Berkshire Regional School District. Retrieved
May 31, 2007. Website: http://www.sbrsd.org/.

J&J Consulting (2007). Highlights of Monterey. Retrieved June 2, 2007.
Website: http://www.bidwellhousemuseum.org/Montere_Tyringhamhm/monterey.htm
monterey.htm.

Mensch, Ann. (2000). Massachusetts History <-> Genealogy. Retrieved
May 30, 2007. Website: http://home.att.net/~Local_History/MA-Berkshire-Co.htm.

ONS Inc. (2006). The Berkshires of Western Massachusetts: Monterey and New
Marlborough. Retrieved June 1, 2007. Website: http://www.virtualcities.com/ons/ma/x/as/maxb0a34.htm.

Sperlingers Best Places: 01245-Monterey, MA: Neighborhood Profiles. Retrieved June 1, 2007. Website: http://www.bestplaces.net/zipcode/default.aspx?cat=EDUCATE&zip=01245&city=Monterey_MA.

The Berkshire Visitor’s Bureau. The Berkshire: Nature, Culture. Harmony.
Retrieved June 2, 2007. Website: http://www.berkshires.org/.

Town of Monterey. Welcome to the Town of Monterey Massachusetts. Retrieved June 1, 2007. Website: http://www.montereyma.org/Public_Documents/index.

US Census Bureau. (2000). American Fact Finder: Massachusetts -- Place and County Subdivision. Retrieved June 1, 2007. Website: http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/GCTTable?_bm=y&-geo_id=04000US25&-_box_head_nbr=GCT-PH1&-ds_name=DEC_2000_SF1_U&-format=ST-7.

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